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Programming language: Kotlin
Tags: Misc    
Latest version: v1.0.4

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README

KFormula

[ภาษาไทย](README-th.md)

Mathematical expression engine written in Kotlin, running on JVM.

Awesome Kotlin Badge [Travis CI](#) Kotlin 1.3.60 MIT License

With KFormula, you can parse simple mathematical expression text and get the evaluated result.

You can add variables/constants, or beyond that, you can define your own function and expose the logic to the engine.

This way you can make your application be able to accept mathematical expression from user's input, or even from database.

If the calculation should be made, simply change the expression to get the new calculation logic apply to your application without recompiling!

Install

Gradle:

repositories {
    jcenter()
    mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
    ...
    implementation 'com.github.vittee.kformula:kformula:1.0.3'
    ...
}

Table Of Contents

Expression

Numeric literal

Only base-10 decimal is supported, no fancy bin/oct/hex/scientific notations.

All values will be stored as BigDecimal instances.

Percentage numeric literal

KFormula support a special numeric ended with % sign.

| Literal | Value | |-----------|-----------| | 100% | 1.0 | | 50% | 0.5 |

They can be used in percentage operations

Boolean

KFormula operates the expressions as numbers, so true is 1, false is 0

Variable

Variable name must begin with $ or % sign, followed by any unicode characters and underscores/dots.

Example or valid variable names:

$test
$2pi
%discount
$record.value
$ตัวแปร
$変数

Variable name that begin with % sign can be used in percentage operations

Supported operators

Operation Operator
Add +
Subtract -
Multiply *
Divide /
Exponent ^
Modulo mod
Logical OR or
Logical AND and
Logical NOT not or !
Equal = or ==
Not Equal != or <>
Greater than >
Less than <
Greater than or equal >=
Less than or equal <=

Special Operators

IN range

Syntax:

<expr> in <begin>...<end>

Returns true if <expr> is within the range starting from <begin> to <end>

It is equivalent to:

(<expr> >= <begin>) and (<expr> <= <end>)

Example:

5 in 5..20

Returns true

20 in 5..20

Returns true

4 in 5..20     

Returns false

21 in 5..20

Returns false


NOT IN range

Syntax:

not in <begin>...<end>
!in <begin>...<end>

Returns true if <expr> is NOT within the range starting from <begin> to <end>

It is equivalent to:

(<expr> < <begin>) or (<expr> > <end>)

Example:

5 not in 5..20
5 !in 5..20

Returns false

20 not in 5..20
20 !in 5..20

Returns false

4 not in 5..20
4 !in 5..20        

Returns true

21 not in 5..20
21 !in 5..20

Returns true


IN set

Syntax:

<expr> in [<elements>]

Returns true if <expr> is a member of the set specified by <elements>

Example:

5 in [5,10,15,20]

Returns true

20 in [5,10,15,20]

Returns true

4 in [5,10,15,20]     

Returns false

12 in [5,10,15,20]     

Returns false

21 in [5,10,15,20]     

Returns false


NOT IN set

Syntax:

not in [<elements>]
!in [<elements>]

Returns true if <expr> is NOT a member of a set specified by <elements>

Example:

5 not in [5,10,15,20]
5 !in [5,10,15,20]

Returns false

20 not in [5,10,15,20]
20 !in [5,10,15,20]

Returns false

4 not [5,10,15,20]
4 !in [5,10,15,20]      

Returns true

12 not [5,10,15,20]
12 !in [5,10,15,20]      

Returns true

21 not [5,10,15,20]
21 !in [5,10,15,20]

Returns true


Ternary

Syntax #1:

if <condition> [then] <true expression> [else <false expression>]

Syntax #2 (function call-like):

IF(<condition>,<true expression>[,<false expression>])

The <true expression> will be evaluated only if the <condition> is true, otherwise <false expression> will be evaluated (if provided).

If the <false expression> is omitted and the <condition> is false it will return 0

Note: Both the <true expression> and <false expression> will be evaluated lazily.

For the syntax #1, then can be omitted, but not recommended as it would reduce readability.

Example

Assuming that $fee1 is 60 and $fee2 is 30

Syntax #1:

if $weight > 200 then $fee1 else if $weight > 100 then $fee2

Syntax #2:

IF($weight > 200, $fee1, IF($weight > 100, $fee2))

Mixed syntax #1:

IF($weight > 200, $fee1, if $weight > 100 then $fee2)

Mixed syntax #2:

if $weight > 200 then $fee1 else IF($weight > 100, $fee2)

Returns 60 if $weight is greater than 200

Returns 30 if $weight is greater than 100

Returns 0 if $weight is less than or equal 100


Percentage operations

Any variables with name started with % sign and any numbers that ended with % sign are considered as percentage values and can be used in adding and subtracting percentage from a value.

Only + and - work with right hand side percentage value, e.g:

Expression Result
30 + 50% 45
400 - 50% 200
120 + %fifty 180
400 - %discount 300

Assuming that %fifty variable is 0.5 and %discount is 0.25

Note: Any other operations on percentage values will result in normal arithmetic operations and the result is still percentage value.

Usage

Simple usage

The simplest way is to use Formula class, it has built-in functions ready for use.

Kotlin:

val code = "1+1"
val fx = Formula()
val program = fx.compile(code)
val result = program.eval()
println("result is $result")

Java:

final String code = "1+1";
final Formula fx = new Formula();
final RootExpr program = fx.compile(code);
final BigDecimal result = program.eval();
System.out.println("result is " + result.toPlainString())

Adding constant

Kotlin:

val fx = Formula().apply {
    addConstant("VALUE", 10)
}

Java:

final Formula fx = new Formula();

fx.addConstant("VALUE", 10);

Adding variable

Kotlin:

val fx = Formula().apply {
    addVariable("\$test", 300)
    addVariable("%fifty", 0.5)
}

Java:

final Formula fx = new Formula();

fx.addVariable("$test", 300);
fx.addVariable("%fifty", 0.5);

Adding external/dynamic variable

It is possible to use a runtime variable in your formula. To do so, you can retreive the runtime variable with a callback function, then use it by "\$external" (Kotlin) or "$external" (Java).

Kotlin:

val fx = Formula().apply { 
    addExternalVariable("\$external") {
        getValue().toBigDecimal()
    }
}

Java (with Lambda):

final Formula fx = new Formula();

fx.addExternalVariable("$external", s -> BigDecimal.valueOf(getValue()));

Built-in functions

abs

Returns the absolute value.

Syntax:

abs(value)

Example:

abs(-10)

Returns 10

sum

Returns the sum of all values.

Syntax:

sum(...<values>)

Example:

sum(1,2,3,4,5)

Returns 15

average

Returns the average of all values.

Syntax:

average(...<values>)

Example:

average(1,2,3,4,5)

Returns 3

floor

Returns value rounded down to the nearest integer.

Syntax:

floor(<value>)

Example:

floor(5.321)

Returns 5

ceil

Returns value rounded up to the nearest integer.

Syntax:

ceil(<value>)

Example:

ceil(5.321)

Returns 6

round

Returns value rounded to precision.

Syntax:

round(<value>, [precision=0])

Example:

round(5.321)

Returns 5

round(5.566)

Returns 6

round(5.566, 1)

Returns 5.6

min

Returns the minimum value.

Syntax:

min(...<values>)

Example:

min(5,1,4,2,3)

Returns 1

max

Returns the maximum value.

Syntax:

max(...<values>)

Example:

max(5,1,4,2,3)

Returns 5

clamp

Clamps the value within the inclusive lower and upper bounds.

Syntax:

clamp(<value>, <lower>, <upper>)

Example:

clamp(5, 10, 20)

Returns 5

clamp(25, 10, 20)

Returns 20

clamp(15, 10, 20)

Returns 15

sqrt

Returns the square root of a number.

Syntax:

sqrt(<value>)

Example:

sqrt(9)

Returns 3

sqrt(2)

Returns 1.414213562373095

Adding function

Function can be added to the Formula instance by calling addFunction method.

Kotlin addFunction method definition:

fun addFunction(name: String, vararg signatures: String, handler: FunctionCallHandler)

Java addFunction method definition:

public void addFunction(String name, String[] signatures, FunctionCallHandler handler)
Function without parameter

Kotlin:

val fx = Formula().apply {
    addFunction("one") {
        1.toBigDecimal()
    }
}

Java (with Lambda):

final Formula fx = new Formula();

fx.addFunction("one", new String[]{}, args -> {
    return BigDecimal.valueOf(1);
});

Expression:

one()

Evaluate to 1

one() + one()

Evaluate to 2

Function with parameters

To add a function with parameters, just specify a list of parameter names via the addFunction method.

The parameter can then be accessed by name via args parameter in handler.

Kotlin:

val fx = Formula().apply {
    addFunction("add", "a", "b") { args ->
        args["a"] + args["b"]
    }
}

Java (with Lambda):

final Formula fx = new Formula();

fx.addFunction("add", new String[]{"a", "b"}, args -> {
    BigDecimal a = args.get("a").eval();
    BigDecimal b = args.get("b").eval();

    return a.add(b)
});

Example:

add(1,2)

Returns 3

add(1,add(2,4))

Returns 7

Default parameters

Parameters can have default values by specifying parameter names using <name>=<value> format, e.g. param2=100

Kotlin:

val fx = Formula().apply {
    addFunction("add", "a", "b=1") { args ->
        args["a"] + args["b"]
    }
}

Java (with Lambda):

final Formula fx = new Formula();

fx.addFunction("add", new String[]{"a", "b=1"}, args -> {
    BigDecimal a = args.get("a").eval();
    BigDecimal b = args.get("b").eval();

    return a.add(b)
});

Example:

add(1)

Returns 2

add(1,2)

Returns 3

Variadic parameters

Sometimes, the number of parameters is unknown, you can prefix the parameter name with ... to make it variadic. (Also known as Rest parameters)

Kotlin:

val fx = Formula().apply {
    addFunction("accumulate", "init", "...all") { args ->
        val all = args["all"].rest.eval()
        args["init"] + all.reduce { sum, v -> sum.add(v) }
    }
}

Java (with Lambda):

final Formula fx = new Formula();

fx.addFunction("accumulate", new String[]{"init", "...all"}, args -> {
    BigDecimal init = args.get("init").eval();

    List<Expr> exprs = args.get("all").getRest();

    return exprs.stream().map(Expr::eval).reduce(init, (sum, v) -> sum.add(v));
});

Extending

TBD


*Note that all licence references and agreements mentioned in the kformula README section above are relevant to that project's source code only.